23 May

Risk Elimination and The LaunchDarkly Value-Add

My first week at LaunchDarkly brought me out of the shadows in a hurry.  It began at an offsite strategy session at DFJ, our lead investor, where I learned valuable details about Waterfall vs. Agile software development methodologies. I also gained important insights into a key industry trend affecting the development community: the transition from Waterfall to Continuous Integration/Continuous Delivery (CI/CD).

What I’ve learned as a marketer has deepened my appreciation for what makes the LaunchDarkly solution so unique.

For starters, there are three main categories of customers who will benefit from partnering with LaunchDarkly:

  1. Companies interested in switching from Waterfall to CI/CD
  2. Companies currently switching/recently switched from Waterfall to CI/CD but not yet feature flagging
  3. Companies that are currently engaged in CI/CD, and using a homegrown feature management system

What’s clear is that all three of these customer segments experience different challenges. But all fall into to what our VP of Product and Platform, Adam Zimman, calls “The Risk Gap.”

What is The Risk Gap?

In software development, there is inherent risk in launching new releases. Risk in this case can be broken down into two categories:

  • Risk of losing product value
  • Risk of losing time

The longer it takes an engineering team to launch a new software release, the greater the risk of feature obsolescence. Another risk factor is competitor time to market; those companies that don’t enjoy “first mover advantage” can suffer from demoralized developers who lose interest because they can’t ship quickly enough.

The Risk Gap also means that there is greater operational risk associated with feature releases that carry greater value. The more value associated with a feature update, the greater the risk to your Ops team, because of changes made to your code base.

The Risk Gap is closely linked to the Iron Triangle concept that suggests the following:  while teams should strive to release high value features at a quick pace, the reality is that they’re often forced to pick one or the other (speed vs. quality).

The Iron Triangle mantra is “Fast, good, or cheap. Pick two.”

Let’s see how this affects the three customer categories who will benefit from using LaunchDarkly by examining the Risk Gap/Iron Triangle framework.

CategoryPainDoes Have Does Not Have
Companies interested in switching from Waterfall to CI/CDTakes Dev team a long time to launch releases.-High Quality
-Low Cost - traditional Waterfall methodology
Fast Delivery
Companies switching/recently switched from Waterfall to CI/CD but not yet feature flaggingQuality of releases is at risk.-Fast Delivery via CI/CD
-Lower Costs - not using a feature management platform
High Quality
Companies doing CI/CD + using a homegrown feature management systemA homegrown feature management system is costly to develop and maintain.-Fast Delivery - quick release cycle
-High Quality - continuous feedback loop
Lowest Cost

Each customer category is missing one of the three components of the Iron Triangle: either quality, speed, or lowest cost.

LaunchDarkly’s value-add

LaunchDarkly exists to close the Risk Gap – enabling the largest software engineering teams in the world to responsibly employ the CI/CD methodology, accelerate development cycles, eliminate the risk associated with large releases, and cut costs of developing/maintaining homegrown feature management systems.

For the first time, you don’t have to make tradeoffs with LaunchDarkly.

When you combine the great team here, a revolutionary product, and the opportunity to learn from brilliant minds every day, I am very much so looking forward to bringing our product to market.

05 Sep

To Be Continuous: Category Creation

In this episode, Paul and Edith are joined by Martin Casado, General Partner at Andreessen Horowitz. The group discusses the deeply complicated and difficult process of category creation, with a special focus on technology infrastructure products.  This is episode #24 in the To Be Continuous podcast series all about continuous delivery and software development.

Continue reading “To Be Continuous: Category Creation” »

30 Aug

To Be Continuous: The Process of Category Creation

In this episode, Paul and Edith are joined by Martin Casado, General Partner at Andreessen Horowitz. The group discusses the deeply complicated and difficult process of category creation, with a special focus on technology infrastructure products.  This is episode #24 in the To Be Continuous podcast series all about continuous delivery and software development.

Continue reading “To Be Continuous: The Process of Category Creation” »

02 Jun

Powering Continuous Delivery With Feature Flags

Continuous Delivery LaunchDarkly

Separating feature rollout from code deployment to mitigate risk in continuous delivery

We are in the era of continuous delivery, where we are expected to quickly deliver software that is stable and performant.  We see development teams embracing a suite of continuous integration/delivery tools to automate their testing and QA, all while deploying at an accelerated cadence.

However, no matter how hard we try to mitigate the risk of software delivery, almost all end-user software releases are strictly coupled with some form of code deployment. This means that companies must rely on testing and QA to identify all issues before a release hits production. It also means that companies primarily rely on version control systems or scraped together config files to control feature releases and mitigate risk.  For instance, many homegrown feature release systems rely on hard coded values read from config files.  These systems can work with a handful of configuration values, but accrue massive technical debt at scale and may require a full redeploy for any updates.

Once a release is in production, it is basically out in the wild.  Without proper controls, rolling back to previous versions becomes a code deployment exercise, requiring engineering expertise and increasing the potential for downtime. Continue reading “Powering Continuous Delivery With Feature Flags” »